War Stories

  • Jan 08, 2016

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It’s nearly impossible for the uninitiated to fully appreciate what it’s like to be a soldier at war, and yet it’s really the duty of every American to at least try. After all, the personal sacrifices made by the members of our military, the harrowing experiences and losses endured by even those who return to us fully intact, are made on our behalf.

So with an eye toward understanding, we’re proud to help get the word out about History Channel’s Live to Tell, a new series that offers warriors who’ve served on the battlefields of Afghanistan and Iraq the opportunity to share their personal experiences of war.

Relevant to current events, history and politics courses, the program is recommended for students in 10th grade and above.

Live to Tell premieres Sunday, January 10th at 10/9c on HISTORY (channel 269 in your DIRECTV SCHOOL CHOICE channel lineup). All episodes will also be available for streaming subsequent to airing.

You can watch the series trailer, below.

And for news about other great educational programs, bookmark this site and be sure to follow DIRECTV GOES TO SCHOOL on Twitter.

—Stephen Vincent D’Emidio

The Forgotten Battle

  • May 07, 2015

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Would it come as a surprise to you to learn that the United States and Japan fought a land battle in North America during World War II?

Since you’re most likely a history teacher, probably not. But you can safely assume that most people these days have no idea that land war in the Pacific Theatre included Alaska’s remote volcanic islands.

Exactly 72 years ago, in May of 1943, U.S. and Japanese forces fought for over two weeks for control of the Island of Attu, which the Japanese believed could be used as a staging point for a U.S. invasion of their homeland.

This Monday, May 11, at 6AM/5C, History Channel Classroom presents Save Our History: Alaska’s Bloodiest Battle, a documentary that chronicles this mostly overlooked chapter of WWII history in reverent detail. The program may be recorded and archived for classroom use for up to one year from air date, and teachers are invited to download a free study guide prepared for students in grades 6-12.

History Channel is DIRECTV channel 269.

For more background on the battle visit History’s dedicated web site, and click here for the free study guide.

And to find out about other great educational shows and resources, simply bookmark this site and follow DIRECTV Goes to School on Twitter.

—Stephen Vincent D’Emidio

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Selling presidents since 1952

  • Feb 19, 2015

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“Advertising agencies have tried openly to sell presidents since 1952,” wrote Joe McGinniss in his seminal 1969 book, The Selling of the President 1968.

And the fact that his observation seems almost quaint in today’s media-saturated political culture suggests that we’ve failed to heed the warning.

Today, more than ever, presidential candidates aren’t so much presented to us as they are sold to us like products—packaged, branded, and target-marketed to various consumer groups. It’s hardly an ideal way to choose leaders, but how many of us, especially young people, ever stop to think about that, much less factor it into our voting?

Sounds like a great topic for classroom study, doesn’t it?

Fortunately, the bright folks at New York’s Museum of the Moving Image have put together an online exhibition entitled The Living Room Candidate: Presidential Campaign Commercials 1952-2012, an exhaustive archive of campaign commercials accompanied by free, common core standards-based lesson plans in English Language Arts and Social Studies.

It’s all you’ll need to launch your own eye-opening study in media literacy and critical thinking.

Check it out for yourself. Visit The Living Room Candidate today.

And to receive more information about great educational resources like this, be sure to bookmark this site and follow DIRECTV Goes to School on Twitter.

—Stephen Vincent D’Emidio

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