Selling presidents since 1952

  • Feb 19, 2015

Captureik

“Advertising agencies have tried openly to sell presidents since 1952,” wrote Joe McGinniss in his seminal 1969 book, The Selling of the President 1968.

And the fact that his observation seems almost quaint in today’s media-saturated political culture suggests that we’ve failed to heed the warning.

Today, more than ever, presidential candidates aren’t so much presented to us as they are sold to us like products—packaged, branded, and target-marketed to various consumer groups. It’s hardly an ideal way to choose leaders, but how many of us, especially young people, ever stop to think about that, much less factor it into our voting?

Sounds like a great topic for classroom study, doesn’t it?

Fortunately, the bright folks at New York’s Museum of the Moving Image have put together an online exhibition entitled The Living Room Candidate: Presidential Campaign Commercials 1952-2012, an exhaustive archive of campaign commercials accompanied by free, common core standards-based lesson plans in English Language Arts and Social Studies.

It’s all you’ll need to launch your own eye-opening study in media literacy and critical thinking.

Check it out for yourself. Visit The Living Room Candidate today.

And to receive more information about great educational resources like this, be sure to bookmark this site and follow DIRECTV Goes to School on Twitter.

—Stephen Vincent D’Emidio

Capturelo

Reliving That Most Infamous Day

  • Dec 05, 2014

Pearl Harbor

Sunday, December 7, will mark the 73rd anniversary of what then President Franklin Delano Roosevelt called the “date which will live in infamy”, and History channel is greeting the occasion with an encore presentation of the documentary Pearl Harbor: 24 Hours After.

Drawn largely from resources within the FDR Library, the film offers a rare and  intimate look inside the White House during the first 24 hours following Japan’s catastrophic surprise  attack on a U.S. Naval base in Hawaii, which resulted in over three thousand American casualties and thrust America into a war that would shift the course of global geopolitical history.

The documentary is recommended for middle and high-school History, Global Studies, and Politics courses, as well as lectures on World War II. And there are free lesson plans available for download.

The 2-hour special Pearl Harbor: 24 Hours After, rated TVPG, airs Sunday, December 7 at 10am/9c on the History channel (DIRECTV channel 269). Lesson plans for middle and high-school students are available free.

The film is also available for purchase from the History Shop.

For more information on great educational shows, be sure to bookmark this site and follow DIRECTV Goes to School on Twitter.

—Stephen Vincent D’Emidio