Introduce Your Students to a Top Young Scientist!

  • Feb 25, 2016

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Hannah Herbst was in the 7th grade, just beginning to realize her love for science and engineering, when a letter from her 9-year-old Ethiopian pen pal changed her life.

The younger girl described what it was like to live with no access to lights, a steady flow of fresh water, and other basic necessities, and Hannah was moved. As she said in a blog post, “I recognized that her situation was not unique and believed that I could use the skills I acquired to take action in an attempt to mitigate the global energy crisis.”

Inspired by a science teacher, Hannah set to work creating an energy probe prototype designed to offer a stable power source to developing countries via untapped energy from ocean currents—a brilliant accomplishment that won Hannah the title of America’s 2015 Top Young Scientist.

And seeing Hannah in action (video, below), you’ve got to believe she’s only getting started.

Do you think that meeting Hannah might change the lives of your students? Find out for yourself by signing-up for a free, live online event on Tuesday, March 8th at 1pm ET, wherein Hannah will share her unique invention, talk about her experiences in the challenge, and answer questions from students.

For more information, visit the Young Scientist Challenge website.

And to learn about other great free educational resources, be sure to bookmark this site and follow us on Twitter.

—Stephen Vincent D’Emidio

Registration is now open for the 2016 Young Scientist Challenge!

  • Dec 22, 2015

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Parents and teachers, please help us inspire the next generation of scientists by encouraging your students to consider the 2016 3M/Discovery Education Young Scientist Challenge.

The annual competition, which was founded in 1999, has introduced the world to a slew of promising young minds—kids who, because of participation in this contest, have learned that working hard to apply what they’ve learned really can set a boundless course for their lives.

The contest is open to all students in grades 5-8, and what they’d be vying for is the title of “America’s Top Young Scientist” and a grand prize of $25,000!

Who knows? It may be your encouragement that changes a kid’s life forever.

Registration is open until 8:00 PM ET on April 20, 2016. For more information visit the official Challenge web site.

And to find out about other great opportunities and free educational resources, be sure to bookmark this site and follow DIRECTV Goes to School on Twitter.

—Stephen Vincent D’Emidio

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3M and Discovery Education announce finalists in the the 2015 Young Scientist Challenge

  • Jun 26, 2015

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We continue to be impressed with the caliber of kids making names for themselves in the Discovery Education/3M Young Scientist Challenge. The annual contest, open to students grades 5-8, launched in 1999 and has introduced the world to a slew of promising young minds.

And as I’ve stated before in this space, what impresses me most about these kidsbeyond the confidence, intelligence and applied knowledge they displayis how nearly all of them seem to have been moved to action by a desire to solve some real-world problem.

For example, among this year’s top-10 projects are efforts to:

-help senior citizens safely navigate stairs

-help reduce stress among those with Autistic Spectrum Disorder, and among their caregivers as well

-help people suffering with allergies

-help reduce the number of auto accidents caused by substance abuse

Help. Help. Help. What a marvelous approach to employing one’s gifts.

And they’re all still just kids.

Each of the finalists will spend the summer being mentored by a 3M scientist. In October, they’ll travel to 3M headquarters in St. Paul, Minnesota to compete for the grand prize of $25,000 and the title America’s Top Young Scientist.

But you can meet them now by visiting the official Challenge web site.

And for more news about education events and free educational resources, be sure to bookmark this site and follow DIRECTV Goes to School on Twitter.

 

—Stephen Vincent D’Emidio

 

3M and Discovery Education announce finalists in the the 2014 Young Scientist Challenge

  • Jul 10, 2014

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When’s the last time you heard a 13 year-old kid say something like “I hope to be a computational bio-scientist” and then go on to explain something called protein glycation with a big smile on her face?

Or how about an 11 year-old who says “I would like to be an architect. I spend a lot of time drafting the ideas of houses of the future that will be interesting for people to live in.”

13, and 11. And they’re serious.

The former is Mythri Ambatipudi, an eighth-grader from California; and the latter is Nikita Rafikov, a sixth-grader from Georgia; and they’re just two of the ten impressive finalists in this year’s Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge.

The annual contest, open to students grades 5-8, launched in 1999 and has introduced the world to a slew of promising young minds. And what most impresses me about these kidsbeyond the confidence, intelligence and applied knowledge on displayis how nearly all of them seem to have been moved to action by a desire to solve some real-world problem. Take, for example, last year’s winner, Peyton Robertson. At age 11, the South Florida resident saw the need for a better sandbag to combat weather-related flooding. He got right to work, and to make a long story short, he went on to make not only a better sandbag, but national headlines.

At age 11.

This year’s finalists are spending the summer being mentored by 3M scientists. In October, they’ll travel to 3M headquarters in St. Paul, Minnesota to compete for the title of America’s Top Young Scientist.

So, teachers and parents, if you’re looking for a way to inspire your own budding scientists, you can start by introducing them to these ten inspiring young people. Then encourage them to take part in 2015′s Young Scientist Challenge. The call for entries opens in January.

—Stephen Vincent D’Emidio